Wednesday, December 03, 2008

More YouTube Fun

Every year, I grow more and more disgusted by the Lexus holiday, "this woman is so rich her husband can buy a $60,000 car without her even noticing" commercials. But this one has to just take the cake. I really hope the grossness speaks for itself:




In other news, I've had some words to say about Taylor Swift. For those not in the know, Swift is a teenage country singer who has become nothing short of a sensation in recent years. She burst onto the scene with a song I love, called "Tim McGraw," and has had hit after hit ever since.

I try to ignore the fact that Miss Swift only reached her eighteenth birthday in the last few months, because then I'd be extra annoyed by the songs she writes about love gained and lost. I tend to enjoy those who write songs for themselves, so I don't want to begrudge Swift her age.

But a few lyrics in these songs have really gotten to me lately. Not because of the age of the writer, but because of the seeming naivete involved.

First, let's go with "Our Song." I'll put the video up here, because it's the simplest way for you to hear the words (I found one that just has the song playing with the lyrics written out, for added convenience). Please pause and read the lyrics that appear at 0:37 (which, strangely enough, are on the screen shot that shows up when I embed the video below):




Why, Taylor? Why does his "momma" not hear you when you "talk real slow"? Grammatical errors aside (which I forgive in most songs, for poetic reasons; the sole exception is the "20 years have came and went" line in Tim McGraw's "Angry All the Time," because "come and gone" fits in there just as well, and has the added bonus of not making me grit my teeth every time I hear it), the line doesn't make any damn sense. I can speak very slowly in a yell, and I'm pretty sure my momma would hear me. Shouldn't it be "talk real low"? Still rhymes, and doesn't make it sound as if the boyfriend might be a little "slow" himself.

The second, possibly less annoying, offense is from a song called "Love Story," which is from Swift's sophomore album. It's all about a girl whose father doesn't like the boyfriend, blah, blah, blah. But the killer line comes in the first chorus. Watch the video (again with lyrics! Thanks, obsessive Taylor Swift fans!):




Now, I realize that Swift has probably spent a lot of time with tutors and/or being home schooled, what with being a recording superstar and all that. But, really? "Scarlet letter," combined with comparisons to "Romeo and Juliet"? I don't get it. You aren't a scarlet letter, Taylor. The scarlet letter, according to Nathaniel Hawthorne, involves adultery, which is a theme this song does not seem to cover.

For the record, every time I sing along with "Our Song," I sing "low" instead of "slow" (same goes for "came and went" in "Angry All the Time"). I wouldn't say it's a favorite of mine, and neither is "Love Story." But I'm without my XM right now, which means I listen to the one and only country radio station in the L.A. area. And they play these songs A LOT. So, without even trying, I've heard them hundreds of times. Each time, I get more and more perturbed. Taylor, you're growing up. Let's make sure we know what we're talking about before we start committing pen to paper, and, likewise, voice to recording device. Okay? Thanks.